Restoration Testimonials
I have been using a product called Evapo-Rust (do a google search for this product) for a couple of years. First rust remover that I have been satisfied with, it is relatively cheap, and since it is not an acid or base, not hard on the hands or anything else.
Duane Larson on on Yesterday’s Tractor discussion boards
JUST GOT THRU WITH THE TANK ON MY FARMALL C AND IT IS SO SIMPLE WITH A NEW PRODUCT,EVAPO-RUST. IF IT’S RUST ,THIS STUFF LOVES TO EAT IT,WATER BASED ,BIO,I’M HAVING A BALL REDOING MY C WITH THIS PRODUCT
OLEN DORMAN
Evapo-Rust works very very well on on rusty cast iron engine parts! My first project was several sets of cast iron wheels that came off of old factory carts and sat out in the elements for some time. I only ordered 1 gal. the first time, being very conservative and unsure of new products. I placed one wheel in a plastic container, per inst. Big problem is a gallon barely covered the wheel completely……when I checked the progress later that evening (approx 8 hrs later) I noticed remarkable progress….the rust had pretty much disappeared. The next day, over 24 hrs I pulled the wheel out and the wheel had a black substance all over it. Per inst. I then washed the wheel with a garden hose nozzle and low and behold I had a like new cast iron wheel. I mean it looked like it just came out of the foundry! The only thing wrong with the stuff is, 1 gallon is not enough to do big items…..I then ordered a 5 gallon pail, which I’ve been using over and over for several months now and a heck of lot of rusty parts renewed. Works very well on saw blades that don’t get used on a regular basis in non heated shops too. This stuff is non-toxic and will not hurt your hide. Of course you need to control evaporation by keeping the stuff in a closed container.
Curt Andree
It works great. I didn’t think it would but it does. Make sure you get enough so you can thoroughly immerse the part. I am going to pick up a 5 gal pail, I already bought the 32 gallon plastic trash can with the cover.
Joe Kelley
I had worked on the Khyber knife that I posted recently with oil and 0000 steel wool, as specified in the sword forums conservation article. There were still some persistant pits of rust that were active even after soaking it with several types of oil for several days. I glued a cap on a piece of 2″ pvc pipe to make something to soak the knife in. The chemical was used full strength. I soaked for 20 minutes and could see that it was working, but there was still red rust in some of the deeper pits. I continued to soak it, checking progress at 30 minute intervals for a total of 2 hours. It took some, but not all of the patina off the blade, Leaving it looking still old, but clean. The heavily pitted areas were cleaned out of active rust, leaving bare metal. The steel was not etched by the action of the chemical as most other rust removal products will do. The blade was washed with soap and water, then dried with first an air hose, then a hair dryer to make sure all traces of water were removed. A coating of lubricant was then put on the blade. I was pleased with this product and will use it again when traditional methods fail. With old blades I always think that the less you do to them the better, but you can’t leave active rust on the blade.
Steve
You could try Evapo-Rust rust remover. It is environmentally friendly and easy to use. Plus, it saves a lot of elbow grease! I used it at home on machinery table tops that got rusty after being stored in my barn. It is pretty amazing stuff!
Chuck Rankin
BTW, this is after I soaked the sending unit in Evapo-rust for several hours. It seems to be a very good and very non-toxic product. It took off a lot of rust.
I use this evapo-rust on everything, even to loosen up stubborn parts like, old stiff ignitors it works very well.